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might grated from, say, california, texas, new mexico, because of job opportunities in arizona over the last decade or so. but that's not unlike perhaps the white population, too. it's very hard to find native arizonans. so, a lot of the people there are transplants from elsewhere and i think that explains a lot as to why the latino voters are still the sleeping giant in arizona. we saw them surge in new mexico and of course colorado and nevada, but in arizona they're still asleep some people ask why. i think in part it's because they have not established rooting, the roots in the community like in, say, california or texas. >> go into the numbers a little bit. what percentage of the population -- we heard the percentage of electorate. give us a sense of the percentage of the population, what they -- growth rate, expansion. >> in arizona, approximately one-third of the population are hispanic background. but when we take into consideration the qualifications to vote, the voting age population, only have 25% eligible to vote in terms of being over 18. but of that population, one-thir
administration and the mayor of new mexico. -- t.j. the town has a number of businesses that have not reopened since the storm. live coverage starts at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >>> my inspiration was the idea i wanted to explain how deal it happened. we do know the story of the cold war, we know that the documents, we have seen the archives and described relationships between roosevelt and stalin and churchill and true man. we know the main event from our point of view. we read them and written them. what i wantedded to do was show from a different angle from the ground up bhap did it feel like to be one of the people who were subjected to this system and how did people make choices in that system and how did they react and behave. it's interesting one of the thing that happened since 19789 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become differentiated. it's no longer these countries no longer have much in common with one another except the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with the pulitzer prize winner ann on life in soviet east germany from the end of world w
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2